Herb Festival!

This weekend, Honest Aromas be at the Cook Forest Herb and Fiber Festival! Have a day of escape into the beautiful woods of Pennsylvania and support the amazing artisans, farmers and entrepreneurs! http://sawmill.org/festivals-special-events/

Saturday, June 3, 2017               10 am to 5 pm

Sunday, June 4, 2017                  10 pm to 4 pm20161002_144537

Come and say hi! We would love to meet you:-)

 

What “Weeds” Do You Have In Your Back Yard?

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The other day, in Do The Next Thing, I touched on using local “weeds” for medicinal purposes. I found a great article about  Creeping Charlie written by Connie Korstens that goes into detail on that very subject!

Many people hate the sight of Creeping Charlie (Glechoma hederacea) will do anything to try to eradicate it. It is often considered an invasive weed that runs amok. But when I see this low growing plant with kidney-shaped leaves and beautiful, funnel-shaped, bluish-violet flowers in the spring, it makes me think of all the amazing medicinal uses it has.

European settlers intentionally brought Creeping Charlie to America for its culinary and medicinal uses. A member of the mint family, the herb forms long trailing stems that create a dense mat over the ground. Another common name for this plant is Ground Ivy.

Historically, it has a rich background and was even used in beer making as a clarifying agent to improve flavor before hops were used. It was also used by painters as a remedy for lead colic. Mostly, it was used as a tonic. Since Creeping Charlie is extremely rich in vitamin C, it was often made into a tea and used to prevent scurvy.

Parts used: Flowers, stems, leaves.

Medicinal Uses: Both Internal and external.

*Soothes inflamed mucous membranes

*Sinusitis

*used for inner and middle ear remedy

*tinnitus (ringing in the ears

*kidney and lung disorder

*head colds, especially with congestion in ear tubes

*bronchitis and viral pneumonia

*cough remedy

*bladder infections

*indigestion

*may be useful for heavy metal detoxification (lead, mercury, aluminum)

*traditional cancer remedy

*Externally used as a wash or poultice for sores, cuts, bruises and ear or nasal infections

*Systems Supported: Kidney, bladder, respiratory, lymphatic, and digestive.

*Plant Preparations: Infusion (tea), tincture, poultice.

*Minerals/Vitamins: Iron, copper, iodine, phosphorus, potassium. Rich in Vitamin C.

*Herbal Actions: Anti-catarrhal – Anti-inflammatory – Antiviral – Astringent – Diaphoretic – Diuretic – Expectorant

RECIPE: Creeping Charlie Tea.

Because this plant runs so rampant, one way to embrace and use Creeping Charlie is to make an herbal infusion. It has a pleasantly subtle mint-like flavor.

Infusions are a great way to build health. Just think of them as a gentle tonic for the body. Tonic herbs are beneficial to the body and they can either increase or decrease the activity of a system, as needed. Some tonic herbs have an overall affect on several bodily systems, while others address a narrow range of processes. Herbal teas are easy to prepare and nurturing to sip.

How To Make It…

Pick enough plant material to loosely fill a quart jar. Thoroughly wash the Creeping Charlie. Place the plant material in a quart jar. Fill to top with boiling water. Cover jar and steep for one hour. Remove plant material and drink either hot or cold. Optional: Add lemon or lime slices with a sprig of fresh mint

Reading this article re energizes me to gain some more knowledge on my back yard “weeds”! When our older children were younger, I often dug up dandy lion roots or clipped other leaves and flowers for medicinal teas. It is all right there, free for the taking! I went out side this morning and collected some of this lovely plant, and I am making this tea as I type!!

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What “weeds” do you have in your back yard? Identify them on the internet, or buy a book on the subject. I am right here, learning along, and becoming holistically healthier with you:-)

Oil City Farmer’s Market and Herb Fest!!!!

Today is a big day!! The Oil City Farmer’s Market starts from 9-4 Mondays and Thursdays through October!!! Unfortunately we won’t be there today, but we will Next Monday!! Come and check out all of the vendors right in front of the Oil City Library!

Don’t forget about the Herb and Fiber Fest at Cook Forest this Saturday and Sunday! This  very first festival we ever did and we can’t wait to go back!! Come and see us<3

Allegheny Woods

The newest item to grace our various shelves is our new, original, Allegheny Woods room spray, soap, and lotion!

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These products came from an idea of a friend, who manages a vacation cabin in our area. We wanted to craft a scent that captures everything we love about the Pennsylvania Alleghenies: fragrant woods, fresh plants, and a minty tang in the air!

This new collection hasn’t made it to our online store yet, but you can pre-order by calling us (814-673-2797) or sending an email (honestaromatherapy@gmail.com)! Don’t forget to visit us in Beaver County this weekend and claim your bottle of Western PA experience!

Basil, Sweet Basil

Spring means new flavors and fresh ingredients! Here’s something we shared back in May on one of our favorite herbs: Basil!

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Hello Friends!

Today I want to share the healing properties of a plant many of us think of as a cooking herb: basil, specifically sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum). Basil doesn’t just smell amazing and taste delicious in pasta dishes. Basil essential oil is helpful for a variety of health needs.

Now, the first thing to know with basil essential oil is that chemical properties can vary from oil to oil. It’s important to know exactly what properties your basil oil possesses for maximum effect. (This is where a certified aromatherapist can help 😉.

Basil is antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral. It is also a wonderful digestive aid and helps the digestive system to overcome nausea and vomiting. It’s also great for chest colds as it has expectorant properties.

Wonderful physical benefits aside, basil also helps with mental and emotional health (which, as we think holistically, we know to also be a part of the body!). Basil helps to increase confidence and motivation and is great to boost mental clarity and happy emotions.

So remember all this next time you add basil leaves to your favorite dish! No wonder it’s such a favorite!

How do you like to use basil in food and around the house?

What basil benefit are you most interested in?

(All information comes from my wonderful teacher Liz Fulcher and her data sheets on essential oils for the Aromatic Wisdom Institute.)

 

Ravishing Rosemary

Hello friends! Today I want to talk about Rosemary (Rosemarinus officianlis), a very helpful herb. Of course, you’ve probably come across Rosemary in a garden or on a plate – it makes a delicious cooking herb! But according to the Aromatic Wisdom Institute, Rosemary is good for more than chicken.

Did you know that Rosemary, like Thyme, has several different variations (chemotypes)? There are three major chemotypes: camphor1,8 cineoleand verbenone. Each variation has slightly different properties, making it important to know what you are getting into!

Camphor helps to improve circulation, while 1,8 cineole is good for the respiratory system. Verbenone also helps clear the airways of mucous, but it also regenerates the skin, making it great for skincare.

Rosemary is great for the scalp. You can add the oil to shampoo or use a hydrosol to refresh the scalp and treat dandruff and hair loss. The camphor chemotype makes a great remedy for sore and tired muscles when mixed with a carrier and massaged into the skin.

Rosemary stimulates the mind and brings energy. It also helps with clarity and strength of the mind. The herb is antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antispasmodic. It helps with gas, congestion, and fever, and it has a warming effect on the body.

We use Rosemary in our joint and muscle lotion blend. It’s awesome for sore muscles and arthritic joints. It also helps with more superficial skin issues, like bruises and scrapes.

So what do you think? Have you learned something about Rosemary you never knew before? We want to hear from you!

“Home Herbal” by Penelope Ody

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When a friend first lent me this book nearly twenty years ago, I was in awe. So much knowledge in a small, easy to read book!

Home Herbal looks at health needs according to age, herbs that can be used medicinally for all manner of maladies, practical ways to use and prepare herbal remedies, and common complaints with instructions on how to treat them. Through beautiful pictures and expert advice, my knowledge was expanded. I got so excited! Mullein and St. John’s wort and calendula and arnica and licorice! Tinctures and infusions and emulsions and ointments!

This book helped me learn to treat my chronic bronchitis (with mullein) and set me on a road to looking at health and medicine differently than I ever had before. I got my own copy and I still keep it as a reference for using herbal remedies. Check it out yourself; you won’t be sorry! It’s an invaluable tool for anyone wanting to learn more about holistic health. Click the picture below to find it on Amazon for a penny!

Have you ever read Home Herbal? What do you think?

What resources have been invaluable to you in your journey towards healthful living?